Thursday, August 25, 2016



Sunday, August 28, 2016
Thoughts from the Pastor …
There are such beautiful and rich words in the Christian vocabulary. These words are not only given to stimulate our thoughts but to move into our hearts. Think of the beautiful words we can use such as light and love and life. But the word grace is by far the most meaningful of them all and it sets our heart to song.
. . . and so the story of the prodigal son come to such a strange ending. The one son who was bad is saved and the elder son becomes lost. And the difference in this story can be summed up in one word “grace”. The bad son was humble enough to accept such grace and the elder son was too proud to receive it.
Such is the world we live in today – a world tempted by legalism. One of the most imperative tasks we will ever do is to keep ourselves from slipping into this mindset.
Each one of us need to ask, “what makes this so appealing to some many?” It only makes us hard, proud, and judgmental and literally dries up any compassion we might have. This has the ability to enslave our thinking and will eventually (if never checked and released) destroy us.
My friends . . . there is only one answer to legalism and that is grace. Jesus knew this and ministered to those around Him in it. The apostle Paul found out such grace and shares that with us in his many letters . . . and every generation has to learn how to find that answer again and again.
Grace . . . it can and will be such a wonderful and surprising thing . . . seek it while it may be found!

Thursday, August 18, 2016



Sunday, August 21, 2016
Thoughts from the Pastor …
There are such beautiful and rich words in the Christian vocabulary. These words are not only given to stimulate our thoughts but to move into our hearts. Think of the beautiful words we can use such as light and love and life. But the word grace is by far the most meaningful of them all and it sets our heart to song.
We jump into the life of the prodigal son this week in our thoughts on grace. He was not a very kind or respectful person. He was one who walked away from his home and lost all of his wealth on reckless living and immoral behaviour and quite frankly brought shame upon the family name. With everything gone he returns home, tail between his legs, ashamed and hopeful for a morsel of forgiveness. However, we know in this story that the father does not condemn him but embraces his son . . . what was lost is now found! The father spoke to those around him, “my son – my son has come – rejoice with me!”
It was all grace of course . . . but the word grace was never spoken!
As we begin to bring some closure to these thoughts first begun in July . . . we need to understand that the Christian faith is a faith of grace extending although we are often exposed to an ungraceful nature with people, especially in the church.
Return with me please to the story of the prodigal son. So we know that the father accepts the son back into the family freely, lovingly. He imposed no restrictions and did not place his son on notice. And then we have the elder son coming into the picture.
How different with him. Here was one who stayed home – stayed loyal to the needs of the family farm and business – and now angry and we see him standing afar off hearing the sounds of the banquet hall – music and laughter. And the father did not dispute the words of the son. It was all true and yet . . . the elder son had no idea of the meaning of grace.
His approach to the father and the situation made him cold – proud – judgmental drying up the very essence of love and compassion in his heart . . .
(to be continued)

Thursday, August 11, 2016



Sunday, August 14, 2016
Thoughts from the Pastor …
There are such beautiful and rich words in the Christian vocabulary. These words are not only given to stimulate our thoughts but to move into our hearts. Think of the beautiful words we can use such as light and love and life. But the word grace is by far the most meaningful of them all and it sets our heart to song.
Our thoughts this morning prayerfully go in the way of the following: Grace when it is not called grace . . . let me explain. The reality of grace occurs often in the Word of God without the term being used. Grace (God’s grace) is often revealed in the Word without the use of the word itself. And while a good concordance is helpful in our study of the Bible – here in lies its weakness also. The concordance relies on the key words in text to unveil truth. However, where the truth occurs without a direct word reference – the concordance is not very helpful.
Today I want to look at some of these passages where grace is present but the term is missing. If you have your Bible handy open it to Isaiah 1 verse 18. In verse 18 we read, “Come now, let us argue this out,” says the Lord. “No matter how deep the stain of your sins, I can remove them. I can make you as clean as new fallen snow. Even if you are stained as red as crimson, I can make you white as wool”
Look with me now at Isaiah 55 verse 1 . . . “Is anyone thirsty? Come and drink – even if you have no money! Come, take your choice of wine or milk – it is all free!” Consider the parable of the workers in the vineyard in Matthew 20:1-16. There is a strangeness about grace in this story. It is an odd story and does not always seen to add up well in our thoughts. Our first thoughts are for those who worked all day and they seemed to have been cheated. But we need to remember here is that grace is not common, it is uncommon. The order of grace lies beyond the order of justice and yet . . .
Grace is constantly interjecting itself into situations. On this level of thinking from this story and from life itself what matters the most is that we live by grace. Think about it for a moment . . . when it come to love, forgiveness, reconciliation and salvation we are like those who worked for only the one hour in the cool of the day and received the benefit of grace from the owner who in this case if the Lord our God.